reviews revisited II: Aurora Talentum

The original review was posted at FPN almost exactly a year ago and can be found here.

The main difference between the originally reviewed Talentum and the current is that I’ve swapped the original M nib for an italic when I had the chance – I therefore salute Aurora’s easily interchangeable nibs that makes it easy to do such a switch.

“This is a COOL pen! I like the chrome, the fire engine red (that is almost impossible to capture in a photo) – it is the essence of the elegant, sleek, smart unornamented Italian design. I like it so badly. Beauty and function in a lovely combination.”

I still adore the design and find this a modern classic that combines classic and modern features in a way that is both original and timeless. And this colour – a true fire engine red/Italian sports car red is irresistible with the chrome details. It is a pity that it isn’t manufactured in this colour anymore. I’ve owned a black one as well – also very handsome – but this red/chrome combination is the combination that makes the most out of the Talentum design. It is still the coolest pen I have.

“This is a pen with personality. The nib is something very special and I think I have never used a nib with so much personality as this nib – in a very good sense. I am very glad that I took the opportunity to buy this great, clever and smart pen to a very good price. This is an introduction to the Aurora pens that sets a very high standard. I like that this is a non-blingy, super-classy pen made to be used. This is a keeper – even for an unfaithful buy-try-sell person as me. “

Even if I swapped the M nib to this italic (I bought a black Talentum with an italic nib for a very good price and swapped nibs when I decided to sell the black one) I didn’t swap the M because it was a bad nib – I really liked it. I swapped it because this factory made (broad) italic is lovely; good line variation, smooth – with character and without digging into the paper, reliable. It is simply an original, top notch nib. If you look closely on the nib below you see that their italic has a special shape – it is not straightly cut off and I think that contributes to the special Aurora feel. I’d have a hard time rating the different italics/stubs/obliques I have, but this certainly adds something of its own and has its special place in my arsenal.

“An extra plus is that the nibs are easily interchangeable – also with the Optimas and the 88s – so great. Functionality and character, character, character.

This – as mentioned earlier – is one of the premier features with Aurora pens – the interchangeable nibs. It both makes it possible to do as I did – buy the red Talentum with a M nib for a very good price (sale of NOS) and a while later find a black Talentum with an italic nib, swap nibs and sell the black pen with a M nib.

“This is not only a smart, cool pen – it is also very well built. Nothing even remotely cheap about it.”

Even on this point the Aurora continues live up to my original impression.  The glossy, red plastic is very resistant to scratches. I have used it a lot ever since I bought it and it have very few signs of use. I’ve dropped it a few times – without any damage to it. The cap still screws on/off safely. Since it is so resistant I think I treat it a little more careless than most of my other plastic/resin pens, but it doesn’t show.  It is – in other words – classy both on the surface and upon a closer inspection.


All in all – a year later

I’ve used the Talentum a lot during the year that has past since I got it and wrote the first review. The review was overwhelmingly positive, but I find that it still lives up to it. I still consider this one of my few absolute keepers. It is both simple and refined, classy and cool and I still get happy just by looking at it and it is a very pleasant writer. The section suits my hands perfectly, it is well balanced and posts and caps securely. And: it has a great nib and looks like it is ready to take off in 200 km/h. I like that.

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About dandelion

perpetually moving
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15 Responses to reviews revisited II: Aurora Talentum

  1. Sok Ping says:

    Hey Dandelion! Thanks for renewing this review. I love your italic nib. And your writing.

  2. dandelion says:

    Thanks a lot for positive feedback on the Reviews revisited and this review!
    Julie, I like that idea of Talentum being a good way of getting new nibs to the Optima :D

    ArchiMark: Sorry to hear that you don’t have the black one left. I kind of miss it too – sometime I will get a new black to pair with the red ;)

    Mona & Bill – it surely is a bit like having a sports car. I might have to buy a car to match the pen LOL

    OSG: It is a real good buy and I have to admit that it is – even in black – a more handsome pen than the Ipsilon…but I am shallow :)

  3. Pingback: Twitted by lady_dandelion

  4. Mona says:

    I love the sporty fire-engine red! Talk about personality :)

  5. Julie says:

    It’s a great idea to revisit original reviews! I confess I’ve never really appreciated reviews of pens that someone has used for a few days… new pens either are delights or disappointments. It’s how the delights stand up over time that I really want to know!

    I’ve owned one Aurora… a mini Optima. Beautiful pen, nib, and great performer. Yet it found a new home because there were those I liked even more.

    BTW: a friend of mine says it is often “cheaper” to buy a Talentum pen when he needs a new nib for an Optima!

  6. ArchiMark says:

    Great re-review and pics!

    Coming from the guy that got your black Talentum last year….should have kept it and had nib re-worked….oh well…. ;)

    I agree with you that the red Talentum looks great with the black and chrome…the black and chrome pen is nice too, but more sedate looking….but still very handsome….

  7. GREAT review, I like the concept of doing follow up reviews. I’ve got an Aurora Ipsilon which I like, but I did consider the Talentum before I bought that. Im sure Ill end up buying this at some point, and your review is probably pushing me closer to that day. :)

  8. Bill Scherer says:

    Very Nice! My Aurora Ipsilon came back. It has the same 14kt italic nib as your Talentum. They replaced the section, and tuned the nib. It writes so wonderfully now. Your Talentum looks like a Ferrari for the hand. Enjoy it!

  9. Dang, I got all excited when you said that the Aurora nib could be swapped and then I started checking around. The nibs are 3x what I paid for my 88 – I just look at having it ground to an italic.

    • dandelion says:

      But if one is cunning – like me – one can buy a pen with an italic and swap the nibs and sell the “old” nib and the “new” pen :) Just want to stress that the black Talentum which italic nib now sits on my red Talentum was bought used and that I didn’t sell the black Talentum with a medium nib as something else than a used pen :)

  10. Lexi0514 says:

    I bought 2 Talentums and I just don’t like the way they write. I got fine nibs and they are more medium. I’m just sending them to Mike-It-Work here in Georgia for re-grinding to .06 Italics. Hope I like them more when they are done.

    • dandelion says:

      Maybe I should have written something about Aurora nibs being rather controversial – I’ve (obviously) liked the two nibs I’ve tried so far. Interesting that your experience differs from mine when it comes to line width: my medium nib wrote like a fine.

    • Silvermink says:

      Huh. My 88 is the opposite – it’s a medium but has a line width I’d normally call fine.

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